8-Grid Chain Variation

There are many variations of the 8-Grid Chain Quilt Block. Simply google it! There are endless possibilities with using different fabrics too. This is the variation I used in my Fourth of July quilt  Old Glory.

8-Grid Chain Variation Quilt Block Tutorial

Here’s the how-to for this 8-Grid Chain Variation Quilt Block

Cut fabric:

  • 12 squares 1 1/2″ red
  • 8 squares 1 1/2″ white
  • 4 rectangles 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ white
  • 4 rectangles 1 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ white
  • 1 square 2 1/2″ red

Lay out fabric squares into the 8-Grid Chain Variation:

8-Grid Chain Variation Quilt Block Tutorial

 

Sew together the four 4-patch blocks in the corner. Also, sew together the 9-patch block in the center:

8-Grid Chain Variation Quilt Block Tutorial

The 8-Grid Chain Variation is now a simple 9-patch. Complete the three rows before sewing the rows together:

8-Grid Chain Variation Quilt Block Tutorial

Grecian Square

I used the Grecian Square quilt block before. It is also known as the Monkey Wrench. I used it in the quilt I made in honor of my grandmother. But this tutorial will look a little different. Simply reversing the neutral and color creates a very different look.

Grecian Square Quilt Block Tutorial

Here is the how-to for a Grecian Square Quilt Block

Note: These measurements are for an 8″ block. Sew using a 1/4″ seam allowance.

Cut fabric:

  • 2 squares 3 7/8″ red
  • 2 squares 3 7/8″ white
  • 4 rectangles 1 7/8″ x 3 1/8″ red
  • 4 rectangles 1 7/8″ x 3 1/8″ white
  • 1 square 3 1/8″ red

Use the 2 squares of 3 7/8″ red and white to create 4 Half Square Triangles (HSTs) trimmed down to 3 1/8″. Click here for my tutorial on how to make Half Square Triangles.

Lay out the Grecian Square Quilt Block:

Grecian Square Quilt Block Tutorial

Sew the red and white rectangles together:

Grecian Square Quilt Block Tutorial

 

Now the Grecian Square is simply a 9-patch.

Bear’s Paw

The Bear’s Paw is a classic quilt block. While not the most difficult block in my Fourth of July quilt Old Glory, it requires a lot of baby steps.

Bear's Paw Quilt Block Tutorial

Here is the how-to for a Bear’s Paw Quilt Block

Note: These measurements are for an 8″ block. Sew using a scant 1/4″ seam allowance.

Cut fabric:

  • 8 squares 2 1/4″ white
  • 8 squares 2 1/4″ red
  • 4 squares 1 5/8″ white
  • 1 square 1 5/8″ red
  • 4 rectangles 1 5/8″ x 3 7/8″ white
  • 4 squares 2 3/4″ red

Use the 8 squares of 2 1/4″ red and white to create 16 Half Square Triangles (HSTs) trimmed down to 1 5/8″. Click here for my tutorial on how to make Half Square Triangles. If you’ve been following my previous tutorials you’ll now know why I went through the time to create bonus HSTs from Flying Geese and Square in a Square!

Lay out your HSTs and remaining pieces of fabric into the Bear’s Paw:

Bear's Paw Quilt Block Tutorial

Looking at one paw print at a time, sew the two horizontal HSTs together and sew the vertical HSTs to the white square:

Bears Paw Quilt Block Tutorial

Then sew the horizontal HSTs to the red square before sewing the vertical to the paw print:

Bears Paw Quilt Block Tutorial

Complete the remaining three paw prints and then follow my tutorial for sashing to complete the block:

Bear's Paw Quilt Block Tutorial

Square in a Square

Square in a SquareThe Square in a Square block is essentially a diamond. Diamonds can be made by 4 Half Square Triangles (HSTs) or you can follow this latest tutorial for a Square in a Square. Using this method will create a cleaner diamond. As it is very similar to my previous tutorial covering Flying Geese bonus small HSTs can come from the Square in a Square! The block I used in Old Glory is comprised of 4 Square in a Squares.

Here is the how-to for a Square in a Square:

Your first step will be to determine what size block you’ll be working with. This diamond simply replaces a square! Take the size of that square and add your 1/4″ seam allowance. That value will be the base. You will also need four squares cut to 1/2 of the base square plus the 1/4″ seam allowance. Example: 4″ x 4″ finished Square in a Square will require one 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ square and four 2 1/2″ squares. Don’t forget to ALWAYS make a practice block with scrap fabric before committing.

Draw on the diagonal of each square and if you want the bonus HST draw a line 1/4″ off center in one direction. Place one small square face down in one corner of the base. If making a HST that bonus 1/4″ line needs to be on the side of the block towards the corner:

Square in a Square Block Tutorial

Sew on both drawn lines, cut between the seams, and iron open:

Square in a Square Block Tutorial

Repeat on the opposite corner:

Square in a Square Block Tutorial

Now do the last two corners. (The white squares will overlap in the center, but that will be taken care of in the seam allowance.):

Square in a Square Block Tutorial

Flying Geese

Flying Geese Block

Flying Geese, just like Half Square Triangles (HSTs) are very versatile. Some people create entire quilts of Flying Geese, they look great strung together and used as the border of a project, and they can be arranged in an endless amount of combinations to make individual blocks.

An added benefit of making Flying Geese is that each “goose” creates two bonus HSTs! The size of your Flying Geese might influence your decision in if you want to take the extra steps to get that bonus block. Because I made small 4″ finished Flying Geese for my 8″ finished block within Old Glory I knew that very small HSTs would come in handy with other blocks in the sampler quilt!

Here is the how-to for Flying Geese:

Your first step will be to determine what size block you’ll be working with. Think of the Flying Geese as simply replacing a solid rectangle. Take the size of that rectangle and add your 1/4″ seam allowance. That value will be the base. You will also need two squares cut to 1/2 of the rectangle plus the 1/4″ seam allowance. Example: 2″ x 4″ finished Flying Geese will require one 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangle and two 2 1/2″ squares. Don’t forget to ALWAYS make a practice block with scrap fabric before committing.

Cut your fabric:

Flying Geese tutorial

Draw on the diagonal of each square and if you want the bonus HST draw a line 1/4″ off center in one direction:

Flying Geese tutorial

Place one square on the rectangle, corner to corner. The diagonal line needs to run from corner to center of the rectangle. If making a HST that bonus 1/4″ line needs to be on the side of the block towards the corner:

Flying Geese tutorial

Sew on both drawn lines, cut between the seams, and iron open:

Flying Geese tutorial

Repeat with the other square. (It will overlap the center of the rectangle, but that will be taken care of in the seam allowance.):

Flying Geese tutorial

Again, sew on the diagonal and the bonus HST seam if using. Cut between the seams and iron open:

Flying Geese tutorial

CIC: Cranberries & Shallots

CIC-headerThis month members got to vote on the ingredients for the Crazy Ingredient Challenge. I love this new assignment method as it provides more time to allow inspiration to flow. It also gives me the opportunity to sway the challenge in a direction away from one of my many food allergies. I hated having to sit out last month’s Cantaloupe and Capers due to my melon allergy. I’m happy to say that my voted-for selection of Cranberries and Shallots won, by one vote!

There are a lot of directions one could take with this month’s challenge – salad, chutney, cheese log, bread pudding, anything Thanksgiving inspired, etc. I decided to do a simple side dish – elevating Brussels sprouts with sweetness from dried cranberries.

Brussels Sprouts with Bacon and Cranberries

Ingredients:

  • 5 strips of bacon, chopped
  • 1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
  • 2 shallots, sliced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/4 C dried cranberries
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 C water

Steps:

  1. In a large skillet on medium-high heat cook bacon until crispy. Remove from pan and set aside.
  2. Add Brussels sprouts to same skillet and cook 5 minutes. Add shallots and garlic – cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.
  3. Stir in cranberries, honey, and water. Reduce to medium heat, cover, and simmer 7 minutes until liquid is evaporated and Brussels sprouts are tender. Stir in bacon and season with S+P.

*This recipe is modified from http://www.vegetariantimes.com/recipe/brussels-sprouts-with-walnuts-and-dried-cranberries/ and http://sewyoucancook.wordpress.com/2013/11/02/thanksgiving-brussels-sprouts/*

Brussels sprouts with Bacon and Cranberries

To see the other blogs that participated this month click on the link below. And if you’re a blogger and interested in joining us, contact Dawn at spatulasonparade@gmail.com. You don’t have to participate every month, but if you’re up for the challenge, we’d love to have you!

Plaited Block

I think this block uses the smallest pieces of fabric I’ve ever cut, but the effect of it is so worth it, and it’s one of my favorites in my Fourth of July quilt Old Glory. Because of my finished quilt product, I only used two colors for this Plaited Block quilt block, I highly encourage you to look at this “twist” using three colors! Please note, if you do opt to use three colors, fabric amounts and sizes you’ll need to cut will be different, and the sewing plan will be slightly altered from what I did as well.

Plaited BlockHere is the how-to for a Plaited Block quilt block:

Note: These measurements are for an 8″ block. Sew using a scant 1/4″ seam allowance. 

Cut fabric:

  • 4 squares 2 1/8″ red
  • 4 squares 2 1/8″ white
  • 8 squares 1 1/2″ red
  • 12 squares 1 1/2″ white
  • 8 rectangles 1 1/2 x 2 1/2″ red
  • 5 squares 2 1/2″ white

Use the 8 squares of 2 1/8″ red and white to create 8 Half Square Triangles (HSTs) trimmed down to 2 1/2″. Click here for my tutorial on how to make Half Square Triangles.

Lay out the HSTs and other pieces of fabric into the Plaited Block quilt block.

Break off the “arrows” in the four corners to piece together. Sew the red square on the left to the the white square below it and the HST on the right to the white square below it:

Plaited Block Tutorial

Sew the new rectangles to the red rectangle. Sew the remaining three squares together:

IMG_7700

Sew the two pieces from the previous step together.

Repeat with the remaining three “arrows”.

Sew the large white squares to the red rectangles above/below it. Then create the top and bottom rows:

Plaited Block TutorialPlaited Block Tutorial

Sew the middle section together and then sew together your three rows to create your Plaited Block:

IMG_7705

 

 

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