Bear’s Paw

The Bear’s Paw is a classic quilt block. While not the most difficult block in my Fourth of July quilt Old Glory, it requires a lot of baby steps.

Bear's Paw Quilt Block Tutorial

Here is the how-to for a Bear’s Paw Quilt Block

Note: These measurements are for an 8″ block. Sew using a scant 1/4″ seam allowance.

Cut fabric:

  • 8 squares 2 1/4″ white
  • 8 squares 2 1/4″ red
  • 4 squares 1 5/8″ white
  • 1 square 1 5/8″ red
  • 4 rectangles 1 5/8″ x 3 7/8″ white
  • 4 squares 2 3/4″ red

Use the 8 squares of 2 1/4″ red and white to create 16 Half Square Triangles (HSTs) trimmed down to 1 5/8″. Click here for my tutorial on how to make Half Square Triangles. If you’ve been following my previous tutorials you’ll now know why I went through the time to create bonus HSTs from Flying Geese and Square in a Square!

Lay out your HSTs and remaining pieces of fabric into the Bear’s Paw:

Bear's Paw Quilt Block Tutorial

Looking at one paw print at a time, sew the two horizontal HSTs together and sew the vertical HSTs to the white square:

Bears Paw Quilt Block Tutorial

Then sew the horizontal HSTs to the red square before sewing the vertical to the paw print:

Bears Paw Quilt Block Tutorial

Complete the remaining three paw prints and then follow my tutorial for sashing to complete the block:

Bear's Paw Quilt Block Tutorial

Square in a Square

Square in a SquareThe Square in a Square block is essentially a diamond. Diamonds can be made by 4 Half Square Triangles (HSTs) or you can follow this latest tutorial for a Square in a Square. Using this method will create a cleaner diamond. As it is very similar to my previous tutorial covering Flying Geese bonus small HSTs can come from the Square in a Square! The block I used in Old Glory is comprised of 4 Square in a Squares.

Here is the how-to for a Square in a Square:

Your first step will be to determine what size block you’ll be working with. This diamond simply replaces a square! Take the size of that square and add your 1/4″ seam allowance. That value will be the base. You will also need four squares cut to 1/2 of the base square plus the 1/4″ seam allowance. Example: 4″ x 4″ finished Square in a Square will require one 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ square and four 2 1/2″ squares. Don’t forget to ALWAYS make a practice block with scrap fabric before committing.

Draw on the diagonal of each square and if you want the bonus HST draw a line 1/4″ off center in one direction. Place one small square face down in one corner of the base. If making a HST that bonus 1/4″ line needs to be on the side of the block towards the corner:

Square in a Square Block Tutorial

Sew on both drawn lines, cut between the seams, and iron open:

Square in a Square Block Tutorial

Repeat on the opposite corner:

Square in a Square Block Tutorial

Now do the last two corners. (The white squares will overlap in the center, but that will be taken care of in the seam allowance.):

Square in a Square Block Tutorial

Flying Geese

Flying Geese Block

Flying Geese, just like Half Square Triangles (HSTs) are very versatile. Some people create entire quilts of Flying Geese, they look great strung together and used as the border of a project, and they can be arranged in an endless amount of combinations to make individual blocks.

An added benefit of making Flying Geese is that each “goose” creates two bonus HSTs! The size of your Flying Geese might influence your decision in if you want to take the extra steps to get that bonus block. Because I made small 4″ finished Flying Geese for my 8″ finished block within Old Glory I knew that very small HSTs would come in handy with other blocks in the sampler quilt!

Here is the how-to for Flying Geese:

Your first step will be to determine what size block you’ll be working with. Think of the Flying Geese as simply replacing a solid rectangle. Take the size of that rectangle and add your 1/4″ seam allowance. That value will be the base. You will also need two squares cut to 1/2 of the rectangle plus the 1/4″ seam allowance. Example: 2″ x 4″ finished Flying Geese will require one 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangle and two 2 1/2″ squares. Don’t forget to ALWAYS make a practice block with scrap fabric before committing.

Cut your fabric:

Flying Geese tutorial

Draw on the diagonal of each square and if you want the bonus HST draw a line 1/4″ off center in one direction:

Flying Geese tutorial

Place one square on the rectangle, corner to corner. The diagonal line needs to run from corner to center of the rectangle. If making a HST that bonus 1/4″ line needs to be on the side of the block towards the corner:

Flying Geese tutorial

Sew on both drawn lines, cut between the seams, and iron open:

Flying Geese tutorial

Repeat with the other square. (It will overlap the center of the rectangle, but that will be taken care of in the seam allowance.):

Flying Geese tutorial

Again, sew on the diagonal and the bonus HST seam if using. Cut between the seams and iron open:

Flying Geese tutorial

CIC: Cranberries & Shallots

CIC-headerThis month members got to vote on the ingredients for the Crazy Ingredient Challenge. I love this new assignment method as it provides more time to allow inspiration to flow. It also gives me the opportunity to sway the challenge in a direction away from one of my many food allergies. I hated having to sit out last month’s Cantaloupe and Capers due to my melon allergy. I’m happy to say that my voted-for selection of Cranberries and Shallots won, by one vote!

There are a lot of directions one could take with this month’s challenge – salad, chutney, cheese log, bread pudding, anything Thanksgiving inspired, etc. I decided to do a simple side dish – elevating Brussels sprouts with sweetness from dried cranberries.

Brussels Sprouts with Bacon and Cranberries

Ingredients:

  • 5 strips of bacon, chopped
  • 1 1/2 lb Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
  • 2 shallots, sliced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/4 C dried cranberries
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 C water

Steps:

  1. In a large skillet on medium-high heat cook bacon until crispy. Remove from pan and set aside.
  2. Add Brussels sprouts to same skillet and cook 5 minutes. Add shallots and garlic – cook until fragrant, about 1 minute.
  3. Stir in cranberries, honey, and water. Reduce to medium heat, cover, and simmer 7 minutes until liquid is evaporated and Brussels sprouts are tender. Stir in bacon and season with S+P.

*This recipe is modified from http://www.vegetariantimes.com/recipe/brussels-sprouts-with-walnuts-and-dried-cranberries/ and http://sewyoucancook.wordpress.com/2013/11/02/thanksgiving-brussels-sprouts/*

Brussels sprouts with Bacon and Cranberries

To see the other blogs that participated this month click on the link below. And if you’re a blogger and interested in joining us, contact Dawn at spatulasonparade@gmail.com. You don’t have to participate every month, but if you’re up for the challenge, we’d love to have you!

Plaited Block

I think this block uses the smallest pieces of fabric I’ve ever cut, but the effect of it is so worth it, and it’s one of my favorites in my Fourth of July quilt Old Glory. Because of my finished quilt product, I only used two colors for this Plaited Block quilt block, I highly encourage you to look at this “twist” using three colors! Please note, if you do opt to use three colors, fabric amounts and sizes you’ll need to cut will be different, and the sewing plan will be slightly altered from what I did as well.

Plaited BlockHere is the how-to for a Plaited Block quilt block:

Note: These measurements are for an 8″ block. Sew using a scant 1/4″ seam allowance. 

Cut fabric:

  • 4 squares 2 1/8″ red
  • 4 squares 2 1/8″ white
  • 8 squares 1 1/2″ red
  • 12 squares 1 1/2″ white
  • 8 rectangles 1 1/2 x 2 1/2″ red
  • 5 squares 2 1/2″ white

Use the 8 squares of 2 1/8″ red and white to create 8 Half Square Triangles (HSTs) trimmed down to 2 1/2″. Click here for my tutorial on how to make Half Square Triangles.

Lay out the HSTs and other pieces of fabric into the Plaited Block quilt block.

Break off the “arrows” in the four corners to piece together. Sew the red square on the left to the the white square below it and the HST on the right to the white square below it:

Plaited Block Tutorial

Sew the new rectangles to the red rectangle. Sew the remaining three squares together:

IMG_7700

Sew the two pieces from the previous step together.

Repeat with the remaining three “arrows”.

Sew the large white squares to the red rectangles above/below it. Then create the top and bottom rows:

Plaited Block TutorialPlaited Block Tutorial

Sew the middle section together and then sew together your three rows to create your Plaited Block:

IMG_7705

 

 

#BundtBakers: Stone Fruit

BundtBakers

With it being July I knew I had to take this month’s #BundtBakers theme in an All American direction. #BundtBakers is a group of bundt loving bakers who get together once a month to bake bundts with a common ingredient or theme. We take turns hosting each month and choosing the theme or ingredient. This month’s theme is stone fruit and our lovely host is Felice of All That’s Left are the Crumbs.

While I can’t get enough of the smell of fresh peaches and nectarines I don’t particularly care for them. And in thinking of something that’d be great for the 4th of July I knew I had to go with cherries.

Chocolate and cherries are a classic combination. So I knew I wanted to do a chocolate cake. But how to incorporate the cherry? IMG_9243-2I decided to try following the method I use on my popular coffee cake and placing cherry pie filling in the middle of the batter. Well, just like my attempted Mimosa Bundt two months ago the fruit didn’t cooperate like I’d hoped. But this time it created a more beautiful result than I could have imagined! And it also eliminated my need to make a frosting. (For the record I planned on putting some cherry pie filling liquid into a chocolate glaze.) The cherry pie filling fell to the bottom of the bundt pan which created a “pre-made” cherry glaze for the cake. The only downfall is that my brand new star bundt pan didn’t get to shine in all its glory. Thankfully a couple of the stars remained filled with cake batter instead of cherries that I can still show it off.

All-American Chocolate Cherry Pie Cake

Ingredients:

  • 2 sticks butter
  • 1 C water
  • 1/3 C cocoa powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 C flour
  • 1 3/4 C sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 container (5.3 oz) cherry flavored Greek yogurt
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 can (21 oz) cherry pie filling

Steps:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Heavily grease bundt pan.
  2. In a saucepan melt together butter, water, cocoa powder, and salt.
  3. In a large bowl whisk together flour, sugar, and baking soda.
  4. Using a hand mixer add half of the chocolate mixture into the dry ingredients. When incorporated add the remaining chocolate.
  5. Add the eggs one at a time, the yogurt, and the vanilla extract.
  6. Pour half of the batter into the prepared bundt pan. Add cherry pie filling (I did not use all of the can) and top with remaining batter.
  7. Bake 50-55 minutes, or until a knife comes out cleanly. Allow to cool in the bundt pan for at least 10 minutes before turning out.

*This recipe is adapted from Maria & Josh at http://www.twopeasandtheirpod.com/chocolate-sour-cream-bundt-cake/*

All-American Chocolate Cherry Pie Bundt

If you are a food blogger and would like to join us, just send an email with your blog URL to foodlustpeoplelove@gmail.com. All recipes and photographs can be found on our individual blogs, on our Pinterest board, and the #bundtbakers homepage.

And don’t forget to take a peek at what other talented bakers have baked this month:

Cherry Chocolate Chip Bundt Cake by Renee at Magnolia Days

Cherry Carrot & Banana Bundt by Kelly at Passion Kneaded

Peaches n Cream Melba Bundt Cake by Laura at Baking in Pyjamas

Roasted Cherry Kugelhopf with Cherry Bourbon Glaze by Tux at Brooklyn Homemaker

Peachy Bundt by Margaret at Tea and Scones

Plum, Chocolate, and Orange Bundt Cake by Maria at Box of Stolen Socks

Cinnamon Peach Bundt Cake by Beatriz at I Love Bundt Cakes

Cherry Almond Ginger Bundt by Jane at Jane’s Adventures in Dinner

Chocolate Avocado Bundt Cake by Terri at Love and Confections

Black Forest Bundt Cake with Cherry Ganache Topping by Teri at The Freshman Cook

Caramel Mango Bundt Cake by Bea at Secrets from my Apron

Upside-down Apricot Butter Bundt by Stacy at Food Lust People Love

Corn and Beans

This block is by far the most difficult in my Fourth of July quilt Old Glory. It requires sewing on the bias, so be sure to conquer a practice block before using your project fabric.

Corn and Beans Quilt BlockNote: These measurements are for an 8″ block. Sew using a scant 1/4″ seam allowance. 

Cut fabric:

  • 1 square 3 1/2″ red
  • 10 squares 2 1/8″ red
  • 3 squares 3 1/2″ white
  • 10 squares 2 1/8″ white

Cut each square in half on the diagonal:

Corn and Beans Quilt Block Tutorial

Lay out the Corn and Beans quilt block:

Corn and Beans Quilt Block Tutorial

Now work in quadrants:

Corn and Beans Quilt Block Tutorial

Sew the bottom left red and white triangles together on the diagonal:

Corn and Beans Quilt Block Tutorial

Sew your newly created HST to the white triangle above it:

Corn and Beans Quilt Block Tutorial

Sew the middle red and white triangles together on the diagonal:

Corn and Beans Quilt Block Tutorial

New sew the white triangle above the newly created HST and the red triangle below it to the HST:

Corn and Beans Quilt Block Tutorial

Sew the top right red and white triangles together on the diagonal:

Corn and Beans Quilt Block Tutorial

Now sew your newly created HST to the red triangle below it:

Corn and Beans Quilt Block Tutorial

Sew all of the above steps together, making sure to line up your seams:

Corn and Beans Quilt Block Tutorial

Attach the remaining two triangles to the sewn portion:

Corn and Beans Quilt Block Tutorial

Repeat three more times with the remaining quadrants.

You now have a four patch ready to assemble:

Corn and Beans Quilt Block Tutorial

 

 

Top food blogs
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 137 other followers